Poverty and blindness

Couching is still widely practiced in Nigeria, particularly in the north where access to eye care services is limited, particularly for the poor

Caption: Couching is still widely practiced in Nigeria, particularly in the north where access to eye care services is limited, particularly for the poor

 

Poverty and blindness

Data have been analyzed from the Nigeria and Pakistan national surveys, to assess the extent to which indicators of poverty are associated with the major causes of blindness, cataract in particular. The findings show that those living in poor households are more likely to be blind, and less likely to have accessed cataract surgical services. In both surveys women were more affected that men, with greater differences in Nigeria than in Pakistan.

Blindness will not be controlled unless services are targeted at those most in need, supported by policies which make eye care more affordable for the most disadvantaged.

Publications

  • Tafida A, Kyari F, Abdull M M, Sivasubramaniam S , Murthy GVS, and Gilbert CE on behalf of the Nigeria National Survey of Blindness and Visual Impairment Study Group. Poverty and blindness in Nigeria: findings from the national survey of visual impairment and blindness. Oph Epi. In press
  • Ramke J., Zwi AB., Palagy A., Blignault I and Gilbert CE. Equity and blindness: closing evidence gaps to support Universal Eye Health. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2015 In press
  • Gilbert CE, SP Shah, MZ Jadoon, R Bourne, B Dineen, MA Khan, Johnson GJ, and MD Khan. ‘On behalf of the Pakistan National Eye Survey Study Group.’  Poverty  and visual disability in Pakistan. Results of the Pakistan National Blindness and visual impairment survey. BMJ. Jan 2008 336 (7634): 29-32.

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